Dr Tonny ‘Stone’ Luggya (Age 27)

Qualified: Makere University 2007
Internship: Mulago National Referral Hospital
Current Projects: Ketamine’s anti-inflammatory effects
Interests: Member of the Uganda national rugby team - capped 27 times. Founding member of the Uganda rugby medical society - a voluntary first aid medical service provider to the Uganda Rugby Union during rugby matches.

Anaesthesia was always one of the specialties I wanted to pursue for post graduate studies but the prospect of working whilst studying and without pay after 15 semesters of exams and internship made it an unpopular choice. I finally started anaesthesia after my internship after talking with my colleague and former rugby national team doctor, Arthur Kwizera.  He made me realise that Anaesthesia is what would best suit me.  The fact that the AAGBI was willing to financially support students that were taking the training further helped me make up my mind. So slowly everything fell into place.  Some colleagues were also convinced by Arthur and actually took anaesthesia up also.  They are actually now my colleagues


It has been a very good 2 years so far.  The work has been very enlightening and interesting. There have been a few downs with the ups, especially with exam time every 3 months on top of clinical work, but it’s all good at the end and the friendships and support from the department keeps me soldiering on.

I’m now almost in my last year of residency and as they say "Time flies by when you’re having fun!"

Fred bulamba “fredfly”

Interests: Pain management, neuroanaesthesia, diagnostics and anaesthesia equipment.
Other interests: Photography, rugby (fanatic) – volunteer at Kyadondo rugby club.

 

Makerere University College of Health Sciences /Mulago Hospital 2012

It took me only my first two lectures as an undergraduate student to decide that anaesthesia is where I belonged. Never looked back. Motivation from Dr Arthur Kwizera, Dr Kaddu, Dr Musana Fred just propelled me. AAGBI has made my dream come true and I am grateful.

The department of anaesthesia offers the best kind of support that a resident could ever wish. It feels like family. The lecturers are great and dotcom though the study process is intense.

It’s quite challenging to be expected to acquire vast knowledge and gain skills simultaneously in such a short time but this is residence and I am ready.

For me, it’s being in the right place at the right time.

Isabella Epiu

Current projects: Challenges of Anaesthesia care in East Africa; a survey of the quality of Anaesthesia care for obstetric patients in East Africa.
Interests: Founding member of the East African Community Students’ Union where I served as Vice President from 2007 to 2009. This regional interaction with universities in the East African Community helped us create partnerships and come up with common solutions for our challenges as students in the region.

Makerere University College of Health Sciences /Mulago Hospital 2011

I am currently in the second year of my Masters of Medicine in Anaesthesia at Makerere University. My training in anaesthesia has been very motivating and I am particularly enthusiastic about the contribution of safe anaesthesia in achieving Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in low and middle income countries and particularly in East Africa. Safe Anaesthesia and basic intensive care have a role to play in the acutely ill mother and the study I am conducting in the National Referral Hospitals in East Africa will assess the current situation.

I am grateful for the support from AAGBI that has partnered with our department and made my dream a reality. This one year of training in anaesthesia has been very stimulating.

Current projects: Challenges of Anaesthesia care in East Africa; a survey of the quality of Anaesthesia care for obstetric patients in East Africa.

Interests: Founding member of the East African Community Students’ Union where I served as Vice President from 2007 to 2009. This regional interaction with universities in the East African Community helped us create partnerships and come up with common solutions for our challenges as students in the region.

Janat Tumukunde
Interests: Reading literary works (currently reading half of a yellow sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie), dancing, adventure (that’s relative), listening to music.

Makerere University College of Health Sciences /Mulago Hospital 2011

I was born in Ntungamo district, a small town in the South west of Uganda, the second child in a family of six; four girls and two boys.

Throughout my clinical practice, I realized I was more interested in resuscitating the very sick. I loved working with children, I disliked seeing people in pain and the routine questions I had to ask while clerking knowing that there wasn’t much of an intervention either my seniors or I would do. This, along with constant check-ins from Dr. Steven Ttendo (God bless his heart), made me make up my mind to enrol into Anaesthesia and I have never regretted it.

My other Interests include reading literary works (currently reading half of a yellow sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie), dancing, adventure (that’s relative), listening to music.

Aggrey Lubikire

Interests in anaesthesia: Critical care, pain management and obstetric anaesthesia.

Other interests: When I am not studying, I love music, and can DJ any disc or digital music. I love travelling and athletics.

 

My name is Aggrey Lubikire, a 3RD year MMED anaesthesia resident in Makerere University Health Sciences, Mulago, Uganda.

I graduated in 2000 and after my junior houseman training in St Francis Hospital Nsambya, Kampala, I left for the UK to sit for my PLAB and IELTS exams.

I finished my exams and observations while in Crawley, West Sussex, and did some locum work with A&E departments after getting limited registration with the UK General Medical Council.

While doing my rotations in A&E medicine I enjoyed working alongside the anaesthetists during their reviews of critically ill patients during some of the trauma cases. That was the turning point for me. I headed back home to join the programme in Uganda and it was the best decision for me.

I extend my thanks to my sponsors: the Difficult Airway Society (DAS) who give me my stipend, without which it would be very difficult for me to do my MMed programme.

Dr Charles Kojjo

Interests in anaesthesia: Per-operative care and regional anaesthesia

Likes about anaesthesia: it is a very practical course results are tangible, and humbling speciality.

Dr Mary Nabukenya

Interests in anaesthesia: Regional anaesthesia and pain management, paediatric anaesthesia, research.

Other Interests: I like to travel, love music and art, and I like a good party.

Makerere University College of Health Sciences /Mulago Hospital 2010

I am currently in my third and final year of training.

I found out about anaesthesia in my undergraduate training during the brief rotation in the department, and then I forgot about it. During my internship however, while in the A&E, I noticed that there was a group of doctors that were usually called in for emergency situations. Having an interest in emergency medicine myself, I started talking to various people, including Drs. Andrew Kintu, Emmanuel Ayebale and Arthur Kwizera. Having been inclined to Internal medicine initially, I decided that I’d get what I wanted from anaesthesia. It’s the best decision I ever made! I got what I wanted, and then some. The training has been very engaging, intensive, and continues to be exciting. The biggest challenge is the long working hours plus studying. That means less personal time. The stipend from the AAGBI is a great help – reduces the financial stress. On the whole, it has been a wonderful journey. I look forward to completing my training and the world of possibilities thereafter.

 

Dr Mustapha Semugenze
Interests in anaesthesia: Critical care, neuroanaesthesia or cardiac anaesthesia

I found out about Anaethesia training nearly as a case of sheer luck from Arthur Kwizera who I met one evening while shopping in a supermarket. I was swayed by the nature of training that (unlike conventional postgraduate training in Mulago hospital) emphasized knowledge and skills acquisition (as opposed to being a desperate labour source in tough conditions).

Anaesthesia and critical care training has made me appreciate the basics of medical practice (saving lives), whilst staying on top of advanced ‘high-tech’ medical practice (life support). It is my opinion that all doctors in Uganda should get some exposure to anaesthesia and critical care.

I am sincerely grateful to AAGBI for extending this opportunity of supporting my training.

Dr Mwase Richard

Makerere University College of Health Sciences /Mulago Hospital 2011

I developed interest in anaesthesia way back in fourth year undergraduate when I got involved in resuscitation of severe obstetric haemorrhage patients, which was a practical skill with a tangible result.

Anaesthesia training is very interesting and practical with quick decision making

Current interests lie in peri-operative safety, trauma care and cardiac anaesthesia

Challenges in training are financial, work overload and low supervision because of few anaesthestists.